Gordon Square Arts District Pays Homage to All Things Art, honors neighborhood advocates City Council Member Matt Zone and Michelle Zone

April 2nd, 2013 § 0

Media Contact: Judi Feniger
216-961-4242 x239

April 2, 2013 – What says Gordon Square Arts District more than art in all its many forms?  From theatres to galleries to inventive food and drink options, from creative retail to entrepreneurial businesses, no place in Cleveland summons the arts more than this hot near-West side neighborhood, now a national model for how the arts can be a catalyst for neighborhood revival, economic development and jobs creation.

Guests at the third annual Hip 2 B Square (May 4, 2013, smARTspace @ 78th Street Studios) will experience “All Things Art” with an exciting blend of musical, visual, culinary and performance arts.  The event benefits Gordon Square Arts District (GSAD), the unique collaboration responsible for renovation of the Capitol Theatre, Detroit Avenue streetscape improvements and parking additions, renovation of Cleveland Public Theatre and soon-to-begin construction of the Near West Theatre’s first permanent home.

Hip 2 B Square, co-chaired by Jeff Moreau, Sally Stewart and Monica Tarasco, will honor Cleveland City Councilman Matt Zone and Michelle Zone, who met nearly 30 years ago break dancing and stayed to champion the arts which spurred rebirth of their neighborhood.  For Matt and Michelle, the area is a labor of love and commitment.  Matt is a third-generation resident who followed the footsteps of both his parents, Michael and Mary Zone, to represent the neighborhood in Cleveland City Council.  Michelle is a passionate advocate for all members of the community, particularly children.

Hip 2B Square – Saturday, May 4, 2013.  VIP Preview at 7 p.m. (tickets $125). At 8 p.m. ($75).  At 78th Street Studios, 1300 W. 78th St., Cleveland, OH 44012, north of Lake Rd.

Our generous sponsors: Parker Hannifin Corporation, PNC, Cargill Deicing Technology, Huntington, KeyBank, Benesch Friedlander Hahn Loeser and Marous Brothers. (as of 4/1/13).

Guests will enjoy a lavish array of grazing foods, open bar of fine wines & unique beers, great live music, dancing and raffles of fine art, and studio visits.

For more information, to purchase tickets online or make a donation to support Gordon Square Arts District, www.gordonsquare.org, or look for us on Facebook or Twitter. For questions, call 1-216-961-4242, ext. 242.

Hip 2 B Square To Benefit Gordon Square Arts District

March 22nd, 2013 § 0

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Event: Hip 2 B Square
Date: May 4, 2013
Location: 78th Street Studios
1300 W. 78th Street, Cleveland, OH  44102

Media Contact: Judi Feniger
216.961.4242 Ext. 239

Hip 2 B Square To Benefit Gordon Square Arts District

Honors Ward 15 Cleveland City Councilman Matt Zone and Michelle Zone

March 22, 2013 – With a backdrop of the 78th Street Studios, the region’s largest and most creative art space, the third annual Hip 2 B Square will highlight “All Things Art” with an exciting blend of musical, visual, culinary and performance arts.  It benefits Gordon Square Arts District (GSAD), with proceeds supporting the renovation of Cleveland Public Theatre and construction of the Near West Theatre’s first permanent home.

Hip 2 B Square, co-chaired by Jeff Moreau, Sally Stewart and Monica Tarasco, will honor Cleveland City Councilman Matt Zone and Michelle Zone, who met nearly 30 years ago break dancing and stayed to champion the arts which spurred rebirth of their neighborhood.  For Matt and Michelle, the area is a labor of love and commitment.  Matt is a third-generation resident who followed the footsteps of both his parents, Michael and Mary Zone, to represent the neighborhood in Cleveland City Council.  Michelle is a passionate advocate for all members of the community, particularly children.

Soon after Matt took office in 2001, he set to work on a strategic plan to reinvigorate the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare, Detroit Avenue.  The couple drew upon their faith, the area’s diverse culture and their love of the arts to devote their lives to the community that brought them together.  Their dream has borne fruit as today GSAD is a national model that demonstrates how the arts can be used as a catalyst for economic development and job creation through preservation and renovation of historical buildings and complementary new construction.

The event is sponsored through the generosity of Parker Hannifin Corporation, PNC, Huntington, KeyBank, Benesch Friedlander and Hahn Loeser (sponsors as of 3/20/13). Judi Feniger, President of GSAD says, “Each year this event becomes more dynamic, much like Gordon Square Arts District.  This year, we’ll look back and to the future as we honor Matt and Michelle Zone and pay homage to the arts.  smARTspace at 78th Street Studios is a great place for a party, and a perfect example of the role the arts are playing in enriching the community in every sense.”

Hip 2 B Square takes off with a VIP Preview at 7 p.m. (tickets are $125). At 8 p.m. ($75) Party! guests arrive to an ambiance of ‘All Things Art’, a lavish array of grazing foods, open bar of fine wines & unique beers, great live music, dancing and raffles of unique &  original fine art, and studio visits.

For more information, to purchase tickets online or make a donation to support Gordon Square and honor the Zones, go to www.gordonsquare.org. For questions, call 1-216-961-4242, ext. 242.

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[PDF of Press Release]

Hip 2B Square 2013

WVIZ PBS Artistic Choice in Cleveland Gordon Square section

January 1st, 2012 § 0

Discover GSAD Day June 12th, 2010 Event Overview Video

July 16th, 2010 § 0

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The History of Gordon Square Skit – Discover Gordon Square Arts District Day 2010

July 16th, 2010 § 0

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Gordon Square Arts District among winners of 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize

June 21st, 2010 § 0

Published: Saturday, June 19, 2010, 11:59 PM     Updated: Monday, June 21, 2010, 10:59 AM

Julie Washington, The Plain Dealer Julie Washington, The Plain Dealer

capitol-theater.jpgGus Chan, The Plain Dealer “Sex and the City 2″ Girls Night Out party at the Capitol Theatre– a one-time silent-film theater that was renovated and reopened in 2009 — is an example of the vitality of the Gordon Square neighborhood. The Gordon Square Arts District capital campaign is the recipient of a 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize.

It took a small village to raise the Gordon Square Arts District capital campaign from toddler to noisy, energetic adolescent. It’s appropriate that the village will be among those honored Saturday as winners of the 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize.

It’s the first time in recent memory that a Cleveland Arts Prize has been awarded not to a person or an organization but to a neighborhood.

“No one person could have done what Gordon Square Arts District is doing,” said the district’s executive director, Joy Roller. “To give it to one person would be totally unfair. I congratulate the Arts Prize for getting it.”

The Cleveland Arts Prizes — given to creative artists whose work enriches Northeast Ohio and whose accomplishments set a standard of excellence — were announced in May. Artists will be honored at the annual awards event Saturday at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Gordon Square was awarded a Martha Joseph Prize for Distinguished Service to the Arts, given to an individual or organization whose vision or philanthropy has made a significant contribution to the arts in Northeast Ohio.

While only Cleveland City Councilman Matt Zone will go onstage to accept the prize on behalf of Gordon Square, nearly a dozen other civic leaders will receive an Arts Prize medal. They include Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization executive director Jeff Ramsey, Gordon Square Arts District executive director Joy Roller and Cleveland Public Theatre executive artistic director Raymond Bobgan.

The district is a collaboration among Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, Cleveland Public Theatre and the Near West Theatre.

Its capital campaign has set a goal of raising $30 million for five projects in Cleveland’s Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood, involving the area’s theaters, streetscaping and parking, Roller said.

MORE STORIES

And the winners are: Profiles in creativity

MORE INFO

Cleveland Arts Prize

What: The 50th annual prizes recognize artists with ties to Northeast Ohio who have made significant contributions in the arts.

When: Ceremony is at 8 p.m. Saturday.

Where: Gartner Auditorium, Cleveland Museum of Art.

Tickets: $250, VIP tickets (reception at 6:30); $100, patron tickets (reception at 7); $50, general admission.

Info: E-mail info@clevelandartsprize.org or call 216-321-0012.

Gordon Square claims it has generated more than $500 million in economic development in the surrounding community near West 65th Street and Detroit Avenue.

“It’s using the arts for a catalyst for economic development,” Roller said. “The Gordon Square Arts District story is many layers deep.”

A ribbon-cutting for the first phase of Cleveland Public Theatre’s capital campaign was part of Gordon Square Arts District Day on June 12. The neighborhood celebrated with walking tours, music and classic cartoons at the Capitol Theatre.

Among the other prizes to be bestowed are the Robert P. Bergman Prize for leaders who are dedicated to a democratic vision of the arts as well as awards for emerging and midcareer artists, and lifetime achievement.

The Cleveland Arts Prize board of directors solicits nominations, and a jury chooses the winners, said executive director Marcie Bergman.

In Gordon Square’s case, the jury originally received a nomination for just two of the movers and shakers, but the jury felt more of the people involved also deserved recognition, Bergman said.

John Zayac, president of the Project Group, a Cleveland-based firm that manages capital projects, originally nominated Zone and Ramsey for their work with Gordon Square.

Zayac, who lives in Detroit-Shoreway, knew about the neighborhood’s transformation. The Project Group was project manager for the Capitol Theatre and Cleveland Public Theatre capital projects. The Project Group also served as fiscal agent for the district.

While serving as an arts-prize juror in 2009, Zayac noticed the nomination list was heavy with artists living or affiliated with organizations on the East Side. Determined to correct that, the following year he nominated Zone and Ramsey, and resigned as a juror to avoid conflict of interest.

As deliberations were under way, Zayac got a call from a jury chairman asking if Zayac would mind if the jury chose to honor Gordon Square instead of two individuals.

“It’s great the entire district is getting the award,” Zayac said. “Jeff and Matt are first among equals.”

[Original Cleveland.com Article] [PDF]

Business Leaders praise Gordon Square Arts District economic investment

May 23rd, 2010 § 0

Event Video.


Photos from the Business Leaders Breakfast event at the Capitol Theatre.


Related articles and press in the News!

WKYC Article: Cleveland: Governor praises Gordon Square Arts District economic investment

Kim  WendelUpdated: 5/22/2010 7:51:02 AM  Posted: 5/21/2010 3:23:46 PM

CLEVELAND — Governor Ted Strickland touted the Gordon Square Arts District when he addressed about 200 business and civic leaders gathered for a leadership breakfast Friday morning at the recently renovated Capitol Theatre.

Strickland said the District is a great example of how to create jobs and investment in a city neighborhood.

“You are creating long-term economic growth, and new jobs,”  said Strickland. “In the short term, you are creating construction jobs. In fact, dollar for dollar, an investment in a building rehabilitation project creates more jobs than an investment even in a highway construction project.”

Team NEO, an economic clearinghouse for the 16 counties in Ohio’s northeast corner, has tracked the economic impact of the arts district as a dramatic $317 million in Cleveland alone through 2013.

In comparison, the five major projects of the arts district — three theatres, a stylish streetscape and added parking — represent a total investment of just $30 million.

The state of Ohio has invested $1.9 million in capital funds and provided leveraging for $4.4 million in federal tax credits.

Other funds have come from a variety of sources, including the city of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, foundations and private contributions.

“Our urban agenda in Ohio is clear,” said Strickland. “We must build upon the great resources already existing within our cities, we must revitalize forgotten treasures and we must celebrate the cultural and economic vitality that pulses through our cities.”

“The Gordon Square Arts District serves as an example for cities across the nation of how to uncover a neighborhood’s assets, invest in them and watch it take off and deliver more than a tenfold return,” said Christopher M. Connor, chairman and CEO of Sherwin-Williams.

“The non-profits and civic leadership behind its revival have cleverly leveraged the arts into a newly revived, productive community.”

Connor is also chair of Team NEO.

The Gordon Square Arts District, a collaborative work of three nonprofits — the Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, Cleveland Public Theatre and the Near West Theatre — is seen as a national model of how the arts can stimulate economic development.

The Team NEO study did not measure additional real estate and development activity, which is estimated by the Gordon Square Arts District and Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization at an additional $400 million or more.

Most of the restaurants, shops, galleries and other businesses are flourishing, with 33 new ones opening since 2006.

Housing ranging from live-work spaces for artists to spacious condominiums for successful entrepreneurs is in demand.

Additional components include streetscape improvements on Detroit Avenue between West 58th and West 73rd streets and new parking to accommodate residents and visitors.

The theatres provide unique entertainment to attract audiences from throughout the region.

For more information about Gordon Square, please contact 216-961-4242 or visit online www.gordonsquare.org

© 2010 WKYC-TV

[WKYC Article] [PDF]

WTAM 1100 Article: Leaders tout Gordon Square

Project will add jobs and millions of dollars to the economy.
Friday, May 21, 2010

(Cleveland) – Local leaders met at the renovated Capital Theatre at West 65th and Detroit to talk about the success of the Gordon Square Arts District.

The $30 million revitalization program is expected to pump $317 million into the economy of the Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood by 2017. Backers say the Gordon Square project has created 950 permanent jobs, plus 310 construction jobs.

Gordon Square Co-Chairman Dick Pogue says fundraising continues. Governor Strickland says the project is an amazing success. Chris Conner of Sherwin-Williams and team NEO agrees.

Plans are now underway to link Gordon Square to Lake Erie allowing residents to walk from the arts district to the shoreline.

[WTAM 1100 Online Article]

Cool Cleveland – Gordon Square Arts District

May 9th, 2010 § 0

Read the Original Article on Cool Cleveland.com

Gordon Square Arts District

Cleveland is alive with art. It’s one of our greatest strengths.

Would-be artists have been awed by The Cleveland Museum of Art with its world-renowned collection and free admission. Budding violinists have been inspired by the Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom or a Celtic band in a local pub. Thespians have taken to local school productions after witnessing Shakespeare performed on Playhouse Square.

Great art, when combined with opportunities to create it, breeds new ideas, new art, innovation. Nonprofit organizations and community organizations provide instruction and incubation takes place in studios and backstage rehearsals.

In Cleveland, arts districts invigorate our neighborhoods. Gordon Square Arts District was born when $20 Million was spent to renovate the near west side surrounding the Capitol Theatre. Restoration of the Capitol Theatre, a throwback to the era of classic movies like “Gone with the Wind,” was just the beginning. The Cleveland Public Theatre got a facelift and the Near West Theatre was constructed, making Gordon Square a destination for film and live theatre http://gordonsquare.org/capitol.html. You can watch a video of CoolCleveland.com’s Thomas Mulready interviewing Joy Roller of the Gordon Square Arts District by clicking the image below or here. Also pictured are Gordon Square Arts District Executive Director Jeff Ramsey and Cleveland City Councilman Matt Zone.

The streets were enhanced by new street lights, wider sidewalks, and accessible parking in the highway-accessible Detroit Shoreway neighborhood. Long underutilized and not-so-well maintained, Detroit Shoreway now enjoys great restaurants, musicals, galleries, films, and dance, in a clean and comfortable urban environment.

I headed out there on a Sunday afternoon to catch “Alice in Wonderland” at the Capitol. Others had the same idea– there was a line. Inside the theater’s lobby, the shadowy wall-sconce light and dark wood against light walls created the feel of the 1920s, the time of silent movies. The old Vaudeville stage (yes, it IS that old) remains amongst the three screens with digital projection foreign and independent, and the latest pop-culture, films, like Alice. Check out their Classic Brunch and Movie Series: a classic movie followed brunch in the adjacent restaurant, for $25 (call 440-349-3306, ext. 111 for your reservation). Late Friday Shift Schedule includes films like “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” and “The Room,” 6515 Detroit http://www.clevelandcinemas.com.

Cleveland Public Theatre has become the west side’s incubator for new talent. Dancers, choreographers, playwrights, musicians, and directors are encouraged to seek their muse and create art with the support of art professionals. Although students create raw material from inexperience, that doesn’t mean the show is deficient. The theatre has drawn a large audience from around the greater Cleveland area since 1983 http://www.cptonline.org.

Visual arts and design, including fashion, brighten 78th Street Studios a few blocks north on Lake Avenue. The Creative Arts Open House is the best way to see what the West Side’s art community has to offer. Check it out every third Friday, not the same weekend as the Tremont or Little Italy walks, which means you can walk and look at art on lots of Fridays. The hunger and thirst are staved off by light food and beverage every third weekend quarterly when the exhibits change, making it a happy hour experience from 5 until 9 http://www.78thstreetstudios.com. Music stirs in the Lava Room recording studios, and print media is alive and well at the Alternative Press.

After all that exploring, you’ll be hungry, and although Gypsy Beans & Baking Company is great for coffee and pastries, pasta at Luxe will taste heavenly after all that walking http://www.GypsyBeans.com. That’s what I plan to eat after I spend an evening with W.B. Yeats at Cleveland Public Theatre sometime between May 13 and June 5.

“The Secret Garden” is playing at the Near West Theatre Thursdays through Sundays from May 7 through May 23 at 3PM. The kid-friendly production costs just $8 for adults and $6 for children. Call 216-961-6391 to purchase tickets. The Near West Theatre is a grassroots theatre with a focus on educating the public and strengthening people of all ages, with an emphasis on youth. Its philosophy is rooted in the transformative power of theatrical arts http://nearwesttheatre.org.

From Cool Cleveland contributor Claudia Taller, whose passion for words has led to creation of the Lakeside Word Lover’s Retreats, an outgrowth of her work with Skyline Writers.

Her favorite foods are red wine, salmon, ice cream, and chocolate. She loves to read, write, tour wineries, ride her bike, ease into yoga, and cook gourmet meals for friends. Find her at http://www.claudiatallermusings.blogspot.com.

This entry was posted on Saturday, May 8th, 2010 at 3:54 pm and is filed under BizTech, Claudia Taller, Events, News, Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Read the Original Article on Cool Cleveland.com

Gordon Square Arts District, Plain Dealer critic Steven Litt among winners of 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize

May 3rd, 2010 § 0

By Julie Washington, The Plain Dealer [Cleveland.com Original Article]

steve-litt-portrait.JPGView full sizeThe Plain DealerThe Plain Dealer’s critic Steven Litt has won the Robert P. Bergman Prize as part of the 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize.

CLEVELAND, Ohio — In a rare move, a Cleveland Arts Prize has been awarded not to a person or an organization, but a neighborhood.

Gordon Square Arts District — a collection of theaters, restaurants and galleries clustered around West 65th Street and Detroit Avenue — and its leaders are being honored for having the vision and influence to revitalize a Cleveland neighborhood using the arts as an economic engine.

And among other winners of the arts prize is Steven Litt, The Plain Dealer’s art and architecture critic won the Robert P. Bergman Prize for leaders who are dedicated to a democratic vision of the arts.

Gordon Square leaders include Cleveland City Councilman Matt Zone, Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization executive director Jeff Ramsey, Gordon Square Arts District executive director Joy Roller, and Cleveland Public Theatre executive artistic director Raymond Bobgan.

Winners of the 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize — given to creative artists whose work enriches Northeast Ohio and whose accomplishments set a standard of excellence — will be announced today. They will be honored at the annual awards event Saturday, June 26, at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

“This crop of winners is broad-based and reflective of Cleveland today,” said arts prize executive director Marcie Bergman. “I find it thrilling to look at the people represented.”

Here are this year’s winners:

Lifetime Achievement Award in Visual Art: Artist Audra Skuodas spends so much time in her Oberlin studio, her husband jokes that she’ll grow roots there. Naturally a reclusive person, Skuodas has never done the kind of self-promotion that many artists do to goose their careers.

So it was a wonderful moment when she learned that she had received the Cleveland Arts Prize Lifetime Achievement Award in Visual Art.

“It’s just a beautiful reassurance,” said Skuodas, pronounced SKOO-dus. “I exist.”

Skuodas has spent 40 years building a body of work that includes wall sculpture, book making, drawing and writing.

Cleveland Arts Prize

What: The 50th annual prizes recognize artists with ties to Northeast Ohio who have made significant contributions in the arts.

When: Ceremony is Saturday, June 26.

Where: Gartner Auditorium, Cleveland Museum of Art.

Tickets: VIP tickets are $250, patron tickets are $100 and general admission tickets are $50.

Info: 216-321-0012 or info@clevelandartsprize.org.

Martha Joseph Prizes for Distinguished Service to the Arts: Honors an individual or organization whose vision or philanthropy has made a significant contribution to the arts in Northeast Ohio. It is being awarded to Gordon Square Arts District and its leaders.

Other winners include:

• Joanne Cohen, executive director of the Art and Medicine Institute’s Art Program at the Cleveland Clinic.

david-giffels.jpgHarper Collins BooksFormer Akron Beacon Journal reporter and author David Giffels is the recipient of the 2010 Cleveland Arts Prize’s midcareer award.

• Trudy Wiesenberger, curator and creator of the Art Program at University Hospitals of Cleveland, a trustee at Cleveland Institute of Art and a co-founder of the institute’s craft council.

• Mary Louise Hahn, former chair of the Cleveland Arts Prize and consultant for the Cleveland Foundation, where she bolstered the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award jury, increased the awards prize to $10,000, and turned the awards ceremony into a compelling event.

• Mickie McGraw, co-founder of the Art Studio at MetroHealth Medical Center.

Emerging Artist Award in Literature: This prize, awarded to a promising artist living in Northeast Ohio, carries a $5,000 prize. Poet and author Phil Metres, an associate professor of English at John Carroll University, is the recipient.

Mid-Career Awards: This honor spotlights artists who have received national and regional recognition and have lived in this region. The literature award will go to David Giffels, former Akron Beacon Journal reporter and author of “All the Way Home.” Giffels is assistant professor of English at the University of Akron. The music and dance prize will go to world percussionist Jamey Haddad, visiting associate professor of percussion at Oberlin College. Giffels and Haddad each will receive $2,500.

Lifetime Achievement Award: Writer Henry Adams, professor of art history at Case Western Reserve University, is the author of “Eakins Revealed: The Secret Life of an American Artist.”

[PDF] [Original Cleveland.com Article]

Cleveland’s Gordon Square Arts District: The Art of Economic Development

April 8th, 2010 § 0

Theaters, Galleries Spark Real Estate Activity and a Retail Revival

CLEVELAND, OH–(Marketwire – April 8, 2010) – The Gordon Square Arts District in Cleveland’s Detroit Shoreway neighborhood is rewriting the way the arts can rapidly shape neighborhood redevelopment. It’s a unique economic dynamo, created by a team of innovative nonprofit organizations for this aging, historic working-class enclave on the bluff of Lake Erie.

Theaters and galleries help anchor the neighborhood, along with waves of new shops, restaurants and housing. Ultimately, $30 million in seminal projects is predicted to cash in at more than $400 million in commercial and residential real estate development, plus hundreds of permanent jobs and a projected $317 million of economic output in Cleveland by 2013. Here is how this came about:

The executive directors and boards of three participating non-profits — Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, Cleveland Public Theatre and Near West Theatre — displayed courage and vision to break the mold and create the Gordon Square Arts District. In doing so, they agreed to limit independent fund raising and make fund raising for the arts district a priority, delegate considerable governance to a board with a majority of independent directors and promote the betterment of the whole through other collaborations.

Other cities have employed the arts as a tool for development. But the Gordon Square Arts District is believed to be the first instance where existing nonprofits, already owners of established theaters and programming, have coalesced to do planning, fund raising, renovation, new construction and infrastructure improvements. Nearly sixty percent of the $30 million goal has already been raised from public and private donors.

The three participating nonprofits also have a common mission of social justice and working with underserved populations — demonstrated in part by a $1 million neighborhood responsibility fund. It will be used to give current residents and businesses advantages such as low- or no-interest loans, abated increases in property tax or business improvement district assessments, transportation and human services like day care and job placement.

Only three years old, the Gordon Square Arts District has attracted 33 new shops, restaurants, artists’ studios and other new businesses, resulting in a commercial vacancy rate of just 3 to 4 percent. A $3 million streetscape redesign dresses up 15 blocks of the main thoroughfare, Detroit Avenue, with new sidewalks, lighting and buried utility wires. The central eight blocks also have public art, benches, trees, pavers and wider sidewalks to encourage pedestrian traffic and outdoor dining.

The Capitol Theatre, a one-time vaudeville and silent film theater at W. 65th and Detroit Avenue, has undergone a $7 million renovation. It opened last fall as an independent and specialty film house, also showing quality Hollywood features.

Plans are already being finalized for a new $5 million performance center for Near West Theatre, a community theater with an emphasis on youth, and the $9.4 million renovation of Cleveland Public Theatre, the oldest standing theater in Cleveland and one of the nation’s leading experimental & political performance venues, has begun. The sites of the Capitol, Near West and Cleveland Public theaters are within a two-minute walk of one another.

An analysis by Team NEO, an economic development clearinghouse for 16 Northeast Ohio counties, shows Gordon Square Arts District’s dramatic economic impact. It is pumping hundreds of millions of dollars in goods and services, personal income and tax revenues into Cleveland, across Northeast Ohio and even the rest of the state, while creating almost 800 jobs in Cleveland alone. The district will have created $317 million of economic output in Cleveland by 2013, when construction on its five major projects is to be completed. When the direct and supply-chain effects across Ohio are factored in, the impact rises to $436 million. » Read the rest of this entry «

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